New publication on ELF and teacher education

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A new volume on ELF has just been published: The Handbook of English as a Lingua Franca (Routledge, 2017). Chapter 35, “ELF and Teacher Education” is co-authored by ELFpron’s own Laura Patsko and Martin Dewey of King’s College London.

This chapter doesn’t focus on pronunciation, but it does highlight and discuss a number of key developments in the fields of teacher education and ELF. It also presents a case study of how ELF was integrated into an internationally popular pre-service TESOL training course at a language school in central London (UK).

Click here to download a manuscript version of this chapter* – and please do comment below if you’ve read it and want to share your thoughts!

 

*This means that the text in this document is what was accepted for publication. It is not formatted exactly how it appears in the book – so page references, for example, will be different in the final publication.

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Event announcement: IATEFL PronSIG/GISIG event

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Next month (14 October 2017), Laura will be giving a workshop at the joint IATEFL Pronunciation SIG/Global Issues SIG event in London, UK, about developing learners’ ability to understand different accents of English.

Here are the full details:

How to help learners understand the world’s accents

The use of English as an international lingua franca means learners need to understand a wide variety of accents, both native and non-native. How can teachers prepare them for such diversity? In this practical workshop we’ll demo a 5-step lesson plan, informed by the latest research into ELF and pronunciation.

Click here to register to attend. Online booking closes on 1 October 2017.

Hope to see you there!

 

Event announcement: IATEFL webinar

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This Saturday (9 September 2017), Laura will be giving a free 1-hour webinar for IATEFL about teaching pronunciation for English as a Lingua Franca. Click here to register to attend.

In the webinar, we’ll explore how ELF differs from EFL, what features of pronunciation are high and low priority for international intelligibility, and what classroom tasks and techniques we might use to help our students develop their pronunciation and listening skills in a world with such a diverse range of English accents. All the advice and information will be based on the latest research into ELF and pronunciation teaching.

Here’s the abstract:

What do learners of English need to sound like? Who do they speak to? Who needs to understand them? Who do they need to understand? In 2017, the answer to all these questions is probably not “native English speakers”. Linguists estimate that non-native speakers of English now outnumber its native speakers by at least 3 to 1 (Crystal, 2008), and approximately 80% of interaction in English worldwide takes place with no native speakers present (Beneke, 1991). What does this mean for our classrooms? This webinar will consider new pronunciation priorities and challenges for learners and teachers of English, including practical tips and activities.

The webinar will take place at 15:00 BST (British Summer Time). Click here to check the time in your location.

Hope to see you there!

 

Pedagogy Pop-up: Everything you always wanted to know about teaching pronunciation* (*but were afraid to ask)

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I work for a publisher and a key part of my role is to help our teams integrate research findings into ELT courses, materials, methods and approaches.

One of the challenges I face is how to make research interesting and engaging for the people who need or want to apply research to their daily practice. I find that many people who are not based in a very academic setting (like a university) hear the word “research” and immediately think that it will be boring, dry or esoteric, or that it will take them forever to read and understand a research publication. (And of course, sometimes it is like this, but it doesn’t have to be!)

So last summer, inspired by the innovative format of a 10-minute plenary presentation that I gave at a conference in Spain earlier that year, I decided to hold a series of mini-events to share key insights from applied linguistics research. I called these short presentations “Pedagogy Pop-ups”, and the principles were simple:

  • just 10 minutes long, easy to fit into a coffee break;
  • purpose is to share interesting insights from research and how they relate to our practice;
  • no audience participation required;
  • no slides.

There were five pop-ups in the series, of which three were video recorded. The first one, about teaching pronunciation, is now available to watch here (https://youtu.be/yyga6vIAroE):

While this pop-up isn’t “ELF” in name, it is ELF in nature! In other words, I don’t focus specifically on ELF, but my recommendations are informed by ELF principles.

Note that the original audience for this event was largely composed of ELT publishers and editors, so I make reference to materials and coursebooks, etc. – but everything here is relevant to teachers and trainers, too.

Enjoy, please share, and feel free to comment below!

P.S. I also mention in the pop-up that I can share a list of research and other publications that I referred to when compiling my script. Here they are:

Cauldwell, R. (2015). Listening Cherry 13 – Connected speech rules are too genteel. Published online at http://www.speechinaction.org/listening-cherry-13-connected-speech-rules-are-too-genteel/

Crawford, S. Z. & H. L. Moffie (2016). ‘Activities for teaching reduced speech’. TESOL Connections. Available online at http://newsmanager.commpartners.com/tesolc/downloads/features/2016/2016-06_reduced%20speech.pdf

Crystal, D. (2008). ‘Two thousand million?’ English Today, 93, Vol. 24, Issue 1, pp. 3-6.

Derwing, T. M. & M. J. Munro (2009). Putting accent in its place: Rethinking obstacles to communication. Language Teaching and Research, 42 (4), 476-490.

Graddol, D. (2006). English next: Why global English may mean the end of ‘English as a Foreign Language’. Published online by the British Council.

Jenkins, J. (2000). The phonology of English as an International Language: New models, new norms, new goals. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Levis, J. M., S. Sonsaat, S. Link & T. A. Barriuso (2016). Native and non-native teachers of L2 pronunciation: Effects on learner performance. TESOL Quarterly. Published online at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/tesq.272/pdf

Levis, J. & S. Sonsaat (2016). ‘Pronunciation materials’. In M. Azarnoosh et al (eds.), Issues in Materials Development, pp. 109-119. Published by Sense.

Munro, M. & T. Derwing. (1999).  Foreign accent, comprehensibility, and intelligibility in the speech of second language learners. Language Learning, 49 (supp. 1), pp. 285-310.

Saito, K. (2012). ‘Effects of instruction on L2 pronunciation development: A synthesis of 15 quasi-experimental intervention studies.’ TESOL Quarterly, 46/4, pp. 842-854.

Underhill, A. (2015). ‘Proprioception and pronunciation’. Speak Out! The newsletter of the IATEFL Pronunciation Special Interest Group, 53, pp. 25-34.

Walker, R. (2014). ‘Pronunciation Matters’. English Teaching Professional, 90. Available at https://englishglobalcom.files.wordpress.com/2014/08/pronunciation-matters-etp-90.pdf

Walker, R. (2014). ‘Pronunciation Matters’ (presentation slides). Available at https://englishglobalcom.files.wordpress.com/2014/10/pronunciation-matters.pdf

Walter, C. (2009). ‘Teaching phonology for reading comprehension’. Speak Out! The newsletter of the IATEFL Pronunciation Special Interest Group, 40.

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Interview with Prof. Jennifer Jenkins

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We were thrilled to have the opportunity to catch up with Professor Jennifer Jenkins at the University of Southampton recently, as she inspired so much of our work at ELFpron. It’s 16 years since Prof. Jenkins published  her research leading to the creation of the Lingua Franca Core (LFC) so we decided it was time to ask her what she is researching now, and how her earlier work on pronunciation helped to inform her current work on multilingualism.

We hope this video might be a useful introduction for the teaching training classroom and anyone interested in better understanding ELF. If you are a fan of video content, check out our new page linking to all the ELFpron training videos, available to watch for free.

Many thanks to Prof. Jenkins for her time and continued support.

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English UK plenary: ELF and the multilingual classroom

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Thanks to all those who attended Laura’s presentation at the English UK Teachers’ Conference in London on Saturday 12 November 2016.

You can download the slides from Laura’s plenary by clicking here and, if you missed it, you can watch the video here. (Apologies for the sound and picture quality! The video also stopped recording for several minutes in the middle of the presentation, so we have re-recorded and inserted the missing section as a screencast.)

Live Q&A event with Laura Patsko and Martin Dewey

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Today I had the pleasure of hosting a live teacher development event with my colleague at King’s College London, Dr. Martin Dewey. The topic was “Teaching English as a Lingua Franca”. Martin specialises in teacher knowledge and beliefs (particularly about language use), and I – of course – specialise in accents and pronunciation. Together, we answered questions as they came in from teachers around the world who were attending this Cambridge English Teacher event.

You can watch a video recording of this event here or by clicking on the image below: https://www.facebook.com/CamEngTeacher/videos/1820055328208283/

Please note that the event begins about 6 minutes after the video begins (when the time remaining shows -33:11).

ELF - Cambridge English Teacher event

Some of the questions we attempted to answer were:

  • If not a native-speaker model, what should we refer to?
  • Isn’t “adjustment in an ELF setting” just what we’ve always known as “accommodation”?
  • How do we combat the fear of decline as English spreads and perhaps simplifies?
  • What’s the difference/Where’s the boundary between ‘misuse’ of English in an ELF context and the formation of a new English dialect?
  • What would you suggest if, during a lesson in an EFL context, a student comes up with some ‘ELF expressions’, would you accept it or disregard it or consider it a mistake?
  • Will examination boards eventually accept such variation?
  • Will globalisation definitely lead to simplification? (Will the third-person ‘s’ disappear? Will ‘th’ sounds vanish?)

If you’re a member or guest user of Cambridge English Teacher, you can also go here to read the summary and watch the trailer that were posted before the event: http://www.cambridgeenglishteacher.org/resource-details/2455/english-lingua-franca

Thanks to all who attended!

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